What It Means to Me to be in the Choir – Doreen Jackson

In 2001, my husband and I moved to Milford and I began attending Mass at St. Andrew. After telling the new pastor, Fr. Rob Waller, I had sung with the choir at my previous parish he asked me what I was waiting for? Then he escorted me to the choir loft to introduce me to the Music Director, Dovile Krempasky.  I have been a member of the choir at St. Andrew’s ever since.

I  have had many opportunities to share the gift of song through our Music Ministry including singing at Mass on Sunday, Holy Days and other liturgical celebrations.  Adding music to help comfort others during times of loss at funerals is another way this ministry provides service.

St.Augustine is quoted as saying, “He who sings, prays twice.

Expressing praise, giving thanks and asking for God’s mercy have been a way of praying for me since I was a child attending a Catholic School.  As an adult I continued to join others in choirs as I moved to different parishes.

Last year in October, we were fortunate to host a concert at St. Andrew to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Fatima.  Our choir was joined by several choirs from other local churches in addition to the choir from the National Shrine of Mary, Queen of the Universe in Orlando, Florida.  The event was open to the public, well attended and truly inspirational. As a member of the choir here I felt blest to be able to participate in this event. 

Our relationship with Dr. William Picher, the Music Director for the Basilica continues.  We recently were honored to welcome back the Basilica Choir for a Veteran’s Day Concert.  Nearly 500 people attended, the church was full of Patriotic Music and we were able to thank the many veterans attending for their service.  It was a beautiful and joyful evening.  

Doreen Jackson

So I ask, what are you waiting for?

Maybe the Music Ministry at St. Andrew is another way you are being called to praise and worship God.  It is for me.


Doreen is a Cantor with the St. Andrew Choir at the 9:30 am Mass.

What It Means to Me to be an Usher – Tom Schutte

When I began as an usher I did it because at the mass I attended they were short-handedTom Schutte Picture .JPG
and I was asked to help. I have an immense gratitude for the gentleman that asked for my help. I realized that I enjoyed it. I liked meeting people I worship with and trying to help them enjoy the Mass and getting as much out of it as I do.

Thirty one  years later I still enjoy being an usher as much now as I did when I began.

God bless,
Tom Schutte

What Being an Usher/Greeter Means to Me – Joan Schulte

Shortly after coming to St. Andrew Church five years ago, I decided to become an usher/greeter at Sunday Mass. I thought it would help me feel more a part of the parish community and help me meet my fellow Sunday worshipers. It did all that and more. I really enjoy seeing all the familiar faces every week and making everyone feel welcome with a friendly greeting and a smile. I think all of us in the usher/greeter ministry try to help promote our parish slogan. “The doors of Saint Andrew open wide at the very thought of your coming.”

Joan Schulte
I hope some of you will consider joining our ministry. It doesn’t take much of your time and it rewards you with a stronger sense of belonging to our parish community.

Joan Schulte

What Being an Altar Server Means to Me – Harris Craycraft

Being an Altar Server for St. Andrew has a two-fold effect. First and foremost, it is a great opportunity to help out the St. Andrew community. There are many pieces to the puzzle to make the Mass run smoothly, and I am always grateful to be able to contribute to that through being an Altar Server.

Harris Craycraft

Secondly, it is a two-of-a-kind position on the altar that the congregation does not get to experience. Being closer to the Priest and eventually the Eucharist is another blessing that should not be overlooked. Being an Altar Server means serving the community, the Church, and God at the same time.

 

What It Means to Be an Altar Server – Jesse Hardin

Jesse HardinMy name is Jesse Hardin and I am a junior at Archbishop Moeller High School. I became Catholic in the first grade by choice and it was the greatest decision in my life. In the fourth grade I decided to become an Altar Server. It isn’t a requirement, but for me it was a choice that I love. It is a choice to serve the Lord. I feel more connected to the Lord while serving than any other time. I feel like I am directly helping the Lord while on the Altar. Servers are right there by the priest when the bread and wine are changed to the body and blood and I feel the power of the Lord working as I watch.

When you are serving at Mass or at a special liturgical service, you see things from a different viewpoint than the rest of the congregation. I was serving at the Easter Vigil and all the lights are turned off during the beginning of this service. The Deacon began to slowly raise the Bible at the Gospel. I was behind him with the thurible (a metal censer suspended from chains, in which incense is burned during worship services) and the other server was gradually turning the lights to full power. The lights are gaining in power and the Deacon is slowly raising the Book. The choir starts singing softly and then louder as the lights came up, I felt the power of the Lord working. This moved me enough that I smiled and I was filled with the Spirit.

I also am moved when I am using the thurible. I serve at many funerals and when we are sending the body from the church, the priest incenses the casket. Some priests put the incense right above the head of the casket. This is touching because you can almost see the soul rising to heaven. I love the experience of being a server, as I said, I feel so much closer to God when I do it. I am so glad I became a server. I love Sundays when I get to serve the Lord.

 

 

God Is Calling You, The Question Is

LogoGenesis implies that man from the very beginning was created for the sacred service of worship. It is no surprise then that public acts of worship appear in Scripture as early as primeval times. The instinct to serve God by the sacrifice of animals and the fruits of the ground is visible in the account of Cain and Abel in Genesis.

(Gen. 4:2-7) Abel became a herder of flocks, and Cain a tiller of the ground. In the course of time Cain brought an offering to the LORD from the ground, while Abel, for his part, brought the fatty portion of the firstlings of the flock. The LORD looked with favor on Abel and his offering but on Cain and his offering he did not look with favor. So, Cain was very angry and dejected. Then the LORD said to Cain: Why are you angry? Why are you dejected? If you act rightly, you will be accepted; but if not, sin lies in wait at the door; its urge is for you, yet you can rule over it.

During the next few months, we will be examining the history of our Worship, special liturgical services, as well as the liturgical ministries at St. Andrew Sunday Masses, and Eucharistic Adoration; including, Servers, Ushers/Greeters, Music Ministry (choir, cantors and musicians), Lectors, Eucharistic Ministers, and Adorers. We will look at how these ministries began, what is involved in these ministries, the gifts or talents needed, and finally what you need to do to participate. We hope to provide you with additional information to allow you to explore different ways of participating at Mass. We are all given different gifts and are called to serve the Lord in different ways. Watch for the God Is Calling You logo with open eyes and hearts.

Whether we join a liturgical ministry or not, we are all called to fully and actively participate in the liturgy by uniting our offerings (prayers, works, joys and sufferings) to the Lord as he offers himself to his Father in the power of the Holy Spirit. Then we can all go out and sanctify the world – as at the end of Mass the priest can say – Go in peace, glorifying the Lord by your life.

. . . are You Listening?

The Worship Commission