Bread From Heaven

LogoAlthough we often think of Jesus as a Christian he was a devote Jew who followed all the precepts of Judaism. He was born of a Jewish woman, in a Jewish town in Galilee, was circumcised, studied the Torah, celebrated Jewish feasts, took pilgrimages to Jerusalem, taught in Synagogues, and celebrated Passover with his apostles. So, why is this important to Catholics? It is simple; the origins of the Catholic Mass are rooted in Jewish customs, history and scripture.

Exodus 16:4-6  Then the Lord said to Moses; I am going to rain down bread from heaven for you. Each day the people are to go out and gather their daily portion; thus will I test them to see whether they follow my instructions or not. On the sixth day, however, when they prepare what they bring in, let it be twice as much as they gather on the other days.

Scripture tells us that the Jewish people were waiting for a political messiah who would set them free, a new Exodus, if you will. As the Jews were fleeing Egypt, God took care of them every morning and night for forty years. Each morning in the desert the Jews found dew on the ground and when it dried, it was like flakes and they asked what it was. Moses said, “It is the bread which the Lord has given you to eat.” And, each evening, they were fed quail. The bread was called manna and in the desert, any manna that was not consumed was stored in a tabernacle. A candle was lit next to the tabernacle to indicate that there was manna stored within. The Lord fed the Israelites for 40 years, manna in the morning and quail in the evening. The manna was referred to as “bread from heaven.”

Source:  The Jewish Roots of the Eucharist, Brant Pitre

Tabernacle and Lamp

Today the unused consecrated hosts remain in our tabernacle for the sick and dying. When the candle next to it is lit; you know the tabernacle has consecrated hosts in it.

The Tabernacle at St. Andrew The Apostle Church

The Worship Commission

 

 

 

God Is Calling You, The Question Is

LogoGenesis implies that man from the very beginning was created for the sacred service of worship. It is no surprise then that public acts of worship appear in Scripture as early as primeval times. The instinct to serve God by the sacrifice of animals and the fruits of the ground is visible in the account of Cain and Abel in Genesis.

(Gen. 4:2-7) Abel became a herder of flocks, and Cain a tiller of the ground. In the course of time Cain brought an offering to the LORD from the ground, while Abel, for his part, brought the fatty portion of the firstlings of the flock. The LORD looked with favor on Abel and his offering but on Cain and his offering he did not look with favor. So, Cain was very angry and dejected. Then the LORD said to Cain: Why are you angry? Why are you dejected? If you act rightly, you will be accepted; but if not, sin lies in wait at the door; its urge is for you, yet you can rule over it.

During the next few months, we will be examining the history of our Worship, special liturgical services, as well as the liturgical ministries at St. Andrew Sunday Masses, and Eucharistic Adoration; including, Servers, Ushers/Greeters, Music Ministry (choir, cantors and musicians), Lectors, Eucharistic Ministers, and Adorers. We will look at how these ministries began, what is involved in these ministries, the gifts or talents needed, and finally what you need to do to participate. We hope to provide you with additional information to allow you to explore different ways of participating at Mass. We are all given different gifts and are called to serve the Lord in different ways. Watch for the God Is Calling You logo with open eyes and hearts.

Whether we join a liturgical ministry or not, we are all called to fully and actively participate in the liturgy by uniting our offerings (prayers, works, joys and sufferings) to the Lord as he offers himself to his Father in the power of the Holy Spirit. Then we can all go out and sanctify the world – as at the end of Mass the priest can say – Go in peace, glorifying the Lord by your life.

. . . are You Listening?

The Worship Commission